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Filipino workers in Macau rise to record-high numbers in June

by ROBIN G. PADILLA

An OFW Journalism Consortium news flash exclusive

MANILA—JUST into the first six months of the year, the number of non-resident Filipino workers in the Macau Special Administrative Region already reached record-high numbers.

This is as Philippine Overseas Employment Administrator Carlos Cao recently reported that a hundred overseas Filipino workers in Macau got stranded after failing to find jobs.

A report by the Macau government’s Human Resources Office showed that there are 12,296 non-resident Filipino migrant workers by end June, an approximately 800 increase from the end-2010 total of 11,423.

And as of June 2011, the total number of non-resident foreign migrant workers in Macau already totaled 85,273. Filipinos make up 14.42 percent of the total.

Filipinos are also the second-biggest group of non-resident foreign migrant workers behind the Chinese from the Mainland.

Looking at Macau’s 17 sectors of employment, the 6,500 non-resident Filipino migrant workers in the “households with employed persons” sector—or domestic work—is the biggest sector of all non-resident foreign workers.

These Filipino domestic workers already make up 41 percent of all foreign domestic workers as of June 2011. Vietnamese and Indonesian domestic workers followed suit.

Meanwhile, there are also 1,343 Filipinos doing real estate, renting and business activities while another 1,166 are in Macau’s recreational, cultural, gaming and other services.

In 2008, Macau employed 104,281 imported workers, the same year when there were the most number of Filipino workers.

Looking at the number of deployed new-hire and re-hire overseas workers, the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) deployed 5,713 OFWs in 2010, lower than the 6,729 OFWs deployed in 2009.

A forecast by Macau’s Monetary Authority stated that the number of non-resident workers will continue to rise in the coming months, with the possibility of upstaging the record numbers of 2008.

“As the economy has technically stayed at full employment, the number of non-resident workers would be increased to meet the demand of the expanding services sector,” said by the Civil Aviation Authority of Macau in a Monetary and Financial Stability Review last July as reported by the Macau Daily Times.

Cao said about a hundred Filipinos are now stranded in Macau after failing to find employment.

He warned against accepting job offers of employment in hotels and casinos in Macau, saying that many “illegal recruiters” get workers for non-existent jobs there.

Cao advised prospective OFWs heading to Macau to apply only with licensed recruitment agencies and make sure that they have legitimate job orders from foreign employers.#

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