Footer

DTI’s Go Lokal! Philippines: Great things come in threes – sustainability, responsibility, and creative livelihood

MANILA – This November, Go Lokal! Philippines will bring to Japan a range of lifestyle and fashion products from twenty-nine (29) social enterprises.

From accent furniture, home décor to garments and fashion accessories, Go Lokal! Philippines will feature creations “born” in the Philippines, all hand crafted to blend the traditional beauty of Philippine materials with the modern functionality of Japanese design sensibility.

Two Product Specialists were commissioned from opposite sides of the world to create a collective that intermingles Philippine culture with the Japanese’ love for simplicity and the West’s fascination with color and textures. Shinichi Ito, Japanese product designer, interior designer and professor is the Creative Director and Lead Product Development Specialist. He is supported by Carol de Leon, a US based fashion and shoe designer.

Go Lokal! is a market access platform for MSMEs initated by the Department of Trade and Industry in 2016 through the Bureau of Domestic Trade Promotion (DTI-BDTP). It aims to provide equal opportunities for smaller players to gain access to the shelves of retail establishments without the usual listing fees.

To date, Go Lokal! has 340 MSMEs enrolled in the program where 125 of them already mainstreamed. With the program’s success in the domestic market at Php55M in sales generated the past year, Go Lokal! is now ready for select overseas markets like Tokyo and New York, which are populated by world citizens and armchair travelers with a deep appreciation and love for other cultures.

The top export markets of Philippine furniture are Japan and the United States, which constitute 72% of the total market. Japan is experiencing a construction boom in preparation for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Due to the anticipated demand for accommodation, various foreign hotel enterprises are expanding their business networks throughout Japan.

Japan is also one of the world’s largest fashion capitals with an annual turnover of USD 96 billion, according to Fashion United. Its aging population has likewise contributed towards a demand for casual, comfortable clothes, as many older consumers prioritize these qualities over others.

On November 08, 2018, the Go Lokal! Philippines will be test marketed in Tokyo, Japan as a Concept Store Exhibit in an independent, strategic venue where buyers can visit and conduct business to business meetings with the exhibitors for ten (10) days.

With the theme “Sustainability. Responsibility. Creative Livelihood.”, Go Lokal! in Tokyo is an opportunity to promote the Go Lokal! brand in the Japanese market as a collective of carefully curated Philippine products under a Concept Store which will introduce and facilitate their entry to the Japanese retail market.

Watch out for Go Lokal!’s Tokyo Exhibition on the following dates and venues:

November 7 to 20, 2018 – Good Design Store by Nohara at Kitte Department Store
Japan, 〒100-7003 Tokyo, Chiyoda, Marunouchi, 2 Chome−7−2 KITTE丸の内 3F

November 8 to 18, 2018 – Good Design Marunouchi
新国際 ビル 1F 3丁目-4-1
Marunouchi, Chiyoda, Tokyo 100-0005, Japan

You may also visit the Go Lokal! website: http://golokal.dti.gov.ph/srcl or email [email protected].

This multicolored shaggy stool is made from recycled foil or upcycled plastic waste and G.I. frame in plated chrome. Design by Prof. Shinichi Ito.

This T’boli jacket by Kaayo Modern Mindanao is crafted using cotton with hand beading and natural dyeing and comes in black and gray colors. The Tboli people are one of the indigenous peoples of South Cotabato in Southern Mindanao.

Made from braided water lily and hyacinth, this Rhiza bucket bag is crafted by Wow Carmen taking inspiration from a combination of festival of colors from ethnic and cultural fashion. Design by Carol de Leon.

Made from Mahogany or Gmelina Wood, this box table in natural color is made through metalworking and woodworking that looks like folding sheets, creating corners and shelving for storage. Design by Prof. Shinichi Ito. (DTI)

, , , ,