WEB AND WEAVE: The Metamorphosis of Ilokano Songs (Continuation)

Let’s prepare another blast to our sacred songs. This time, the ever-powerful internet is used to sound off many sodomistic and uncalled flirtations and immoralities, not to mention “hooked and crooked relationships.”

 Nagimaskan, Mayyang

 

Nagimaskan, Mayyang/Dakkel ta patongmo /Dakkel ta patongmo, agraman ta buy-ongmo /Nagimas ket ngata no inka maramanan /Ay, dios por santo, nagimaskan, Mayyang /Malagipmo pay, Mayyang ti inta pinagsarak /Igid iti baybay sirok ti pantalan /Rabaw iti rakit ti inta nagiddaan /Abotmo nga bidang ti inta nagap-apan

 

Sangabote nga grande ti inta pinagsangwan /Pangpa-imas ta Mayyang ti inta pinagromansan /Ayan na nga pagdaksan innata naduktalan /

Innata naduktalan ti baro a karruba


Nagimaskan, Mayyang/Dakkel ta patongmo /Dakkel ta patongmo, agraman ta buy-ongmo /Nagimas ket ngata no inka maramanan /Ay, dios por santo, nagimas kan Mayyang /Malagipmo pay Mayyang ti inta pinagsarak /Igid iti baybay siruk ti pantalan

Rabaw iti rakit ti inta nagiddaan /Abotmo nga bidang ti inta nagap-apan


Sangabote a grande ti inta pinagsangwan /Pangpaimasta Mayyang ti inta pinagromansa /Ayanna a pagdaksan innata naduktalan /

Innata naduktalan ti baro a karrubam

 

In the minds of the young, this song epitomizes truth and acceptability. Because of its constant airing, and unhampered CD burning and pirating without much protestations from the “moralists,” soon, this forms part of the generally acceptable norms of living. What is plausible in the eyes and ears of the young is not usually counted in their growing years. Plausibility lies primarily on more what they see, observe and interpret as true from the conduct of the old.

Central to the analysis of the Ilokano songs is its value implication. Of the total 25 identified vulgar Ilokano songs, many are plain language compositions while others are mere modifications.


IDENTIFIED VULGAR ILOKANO SONGS

 

The aura of classic Ilocano songs now-a-days is slowly vanishing and fading away. The much cherished intentions, messages, and values had gone astray. They are now supplanted with negatively construed values.

Ilokano songs, which are known for its timeless romance and purity, are gradually losing its essence due to the emergence and advocacy of some with green jokes and its triumphantly getting the malicious message across.

Songs are said to be reflections of experiences in our day to day living focusing mostly on love. Listening to the latest Ilocano songs of today such as “Baliwak ti Uso”, “Jambo-Jambo”, “Tarong and “Nagplupluplokplok”, one may find out that vast network of imagination it creates, from frenzy laughing to nasty thinking.

Unconsciously, the listeners particularly the young may not mind so much, but the songs bereft with values contrary to established tenets soon entertaining wild, erotic imaginations mainly due to the use of symbolic imagery or symbolic terms. Whether this is acceptable or not, moral concerns, facts and issues shaping our society are in a state of dilemma.

Songs, in their simplest way, provide an array of mechanisms in enjoying life, albeit dissolute…


MANI

This song reflects a woman selling “mani” or peanut. It discusses many characteristics of peanut which in the Ilokano lexicon, it is depictive, too, to the woman’s vulva. So when someone analyzes the song, especially to people who have wild, erotic imagination, they liken the “mani” with a female reproductive organ, with all the nasty, tasty and guile facets. Humiliative as it is, this song undermines and continues to shake the moral fiber of our community, with great emphasis on women credulity.

  (To be continued)