WHATS INSIDE? (Part I)

This one important research output of UNP Candon has something to do with the livelihood employment of the residents of Santiago and San Esteban, Ilocos Sur.

Given the insight how hard to earn a living, the researchers of UNP Candon tried to evaluate the practices of the stone carvers and highlight their major tasks, as a form of help to them.

That’s why we have this as a basis for development.

We hope, our good policy makers will gain knowledge along this and help these unsung stone carvers.

We lend this time a space to this significant output. The title is very secretive. Find out why.


THE HIDDEN  FIGURES   OF ILOCOS’ STONES. Researchers: Andres T. Malinnag, Jr., Ed.D. and Jaime G. Raras, Ed.D.


This is a paper presented by Dr. Andres T. Malinnag, Jr. at the NAKEM 2006 International Conference under the auspices of the Ilokano Language & Literature Program of the University of Hawaii at Manoa,Hawaii, USA, November 9-12, 2006.


ABSTRACT


The “Hidden Figures of Ilocos’ Stones” as a basis for development revealed the socio-economic profile, the level of difficulties and inventory level along tools and equipments used, the transportation and facilities used, health and safety, the associations (cooperatives), the needs for technology transfer, marketing needs; the prospects in marketing flow and physical flow, and antiquity of art forms.

The researchers used the descriptive method of research. To enrich the study, unscheduled interview to the respondents and observations to the plant-site was also conducted in order to expose the present practices and art forms; and prospects for development of the aforementioned industry. The Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS Version 10.0) was used to treat the computations of data.

The researchers generally portrayed the industry with these findings: the stone mining and carving industry typically are quarries with small fabrication plants capable normally of producing only cubical work.

The producers are capable of producing different art forms such as: tiles and slabs called Piedra Pinoy or Baldoza, mortar and pestles or Almires for kitchen use; Chinese Pagoda for landscaping and decorations of gardens; Table Set; Benches; Fountains; Lamp Shades (of different sizes in all items), and other souvenir items. Other products are sold to bigger contractors for cladding of commercial buildings, or large residential jobs for walls and retainer walls or other uses in residential construction including landscaping purposes.

 

        Introduction


For a glance, the producers (stone miners and carvers) typically are quarries with small fabrication plants capable normally of producing only cubical work.  This work is sold to capitalists or contractors for cladding of commercial buildings, or large residential jobs for walls and retainer walls or other uses in residential construction including landscaping purposes.  Producers are capable of producing tiles and slabs called Piedra Pinoy or baldosa, mortar and pestles (almires) for kitchens; Chinese Pagoda for landscaping of gardens; table (set); b bench(es);  fountain(s); and lamp shades of different sizes in all items for the residential market.

The marketing of stone is antiquated and not international in scope.  Most producers are local or regional, classified slow in the promotion of the products.  Most sales are in house sales and are not through the current channels of architectural representatives or Independent Sales Organizations (ISO’s). 


Background of the Province


The province of Ilocos Sur is located along the western coast of Northern Luzon. It is bounded by Ilocos Norte in the North, Abra in the Northeast, Mountain Province in the east, Benguet in the Southeast, La Union in the South and the Luzon Sea and the Lingayen Gulf in the West. As of June 30, 2001, the province is composed of  2 cities and 32 municipalities and 768 barangays. Approximately 23.7 percent of the province’s total land area are crop lands.

      (To be continued)